Why my ATV has no spark

You’re practically dead in the water if your ATV isn’t receiving spark from the engine’s spark plugs since the engine won’t turn over and won’t give any hints as to why; this can be a very stressful situation to be in. I’ll show you how to search for spark on an ATV and, if none is found, how to diagnose the electrical components to determine the source of the problem.

The spark plug gapping may be incorrect, or the spark plug may have gone bad, or it may be the wrong plug altogether for your ATV Quad bike engine. A spark plug may look fine, but may still have gone bad. Simply, pull off the bolt, insert a new plug, and test for spark.

Quick ATV spark check 

Remove the spark plug from the engine to quickly check if your ATV is getting spark. Reassemble the coil wire and reinstall the connector. Try starting the engine while keeping the spark plug electrodes close to the engine to ground it. Your ATV engine is having a spark if you see it coming from the end of the spark plug.

Keep in mind that the rear brake must be applied on some models when the handlebar switch is in the run position. Examine the area for any other red buttons or kill switches that might have been pushed. When attempting to start the engine on a quad, keep in mind that many of them have to fail safes.

If you’re having trouble determining whether you can see a flame, make a friend keep the spark plug’s electrodes.



Why ATV has no spark? 

There are a few reasons why an ATV’s spark plugs aren’t producing a spark. On these quads, the electrical structures can be a little troublesome at times. Your best bet is to check one item at a time, working your way down the list before you find the source of your issue.

The most popular cause of no spark on an ATV is a faulty spark plug, either the wrong plug or one that is not gapped properly. Alternatively, the spark plug could have failed; this is a common occurrence.

Check for a loose cable, a faulty switch, a bad link, the ignition coil, or a problem with the stator if you know your spark plug is good and gapped correctly. Let’s go over how to search each one individually.

How to test ATV has no spark??

  1. Make sure the engine has the correct spark plugs, and they’re gapped correctly. This might seem silly, but the simplest thing sometimes causes seemingly big problems.
  2. Check the spark plug wire condition.
  3. Disconnect the main electrical connector coming out of the engine, and then check for spark again. This unhooks the kill switch, ATV ignition switch, and wiring for those switches. If the spark improves, the problem is the wiring from one of those switches, or a switch itself is to blame. Now you’ll need to disconnect each switch (one at a time) to trace it to the failed part.
  4. Test the stator resistance. You can get the specs from a dealer or try a search online.
  5. Ensure that the engine is equipped with the proper spark plugs and that they are properly gapped. The simplest things can often trigger the most serious problems.
  6. Examine the condition of the spark plug wire.
  7. Disconnect the engine’s main electrical connector and check for spark once more. The kill switch, ATV ignition switch, and their wiring are all unhooked due to this. If the spark improves, the issue is likely to be with the wiring from one of the switches or the switch itself. To track down the failed component, you’ll need to disconnect each switch one by one.
  8. Determine the stator’s resistance to current. You may obtain specifications from a dealer or conduct an online search. Dealers do not allow returns on electrical components, so ensure the component you order is the problem; otherwise, you can end up with a brand new, costly ignition part and no spark. Consider if any of your friends or riding partners have the same or similar quad; you may be able to borrow parts from their machines to diagnose the issue.

ATV loose wire, a bad switch, or bad connection 

  1. To begin, examine the spark plug or ignition coil wire for damage. When a spark plug is bolted into an engine, this is the wire that connects to it. Since the wire is normally exposed to gravel, rocks, and debris when riding, it can wear out over time.
  2. Check for poor connections or switches if the spark plug wire appears to be in good condition. To begin, unplug the engine’s main electrical connector. The kill button, ignition switch, and all related wiring will be disconnected due to this action. Check to see if you’re getting some spark at this time.
  3. If you got a spark after unplugging the main electrical connector, one of those switches or the wiring for one of those switches is the source of the problem. Now you must go through each turn one by one in order to locate the problem component. An ohmmeter will come in handy for checking each switch and wire separately.


How to test an ATV ignition coil? 

  1. To begin, you’ll need a digital multimeter to test your ATV’s electrical components. To get the ignition coil on and off the rig, you’ll also need some simple tools. If you want to be extra cautious, unplug the battery first. However, I find that simply unplugging the wiring to the ignition coil before removing it is sufficient.
  2. Follow the wire that connects to your spark plug to find the ignition coil. After you’ve removed the ignition coil, you can start measuring it with your multimeter. Begin by checking the primary side of the ignition coil, which is where the coil was wired, rather than the side that connects to the spark plug.
  3. The resistance should be between 0.2 and 5 ohms. Since it differs from machine to machine, this is a wide variety. It’s best to consult your service manual to determine what your ignition coil’s primary voltage should be.
  4. Next, we’ll put the ignition coil’s secondary side to the test. The spark plug caps are on this site. Put the red test lead in one, and the black test lead in the other if your ignition coil has two spark plug caps. Look for resistance of about 16k ohms, but search your service manual for accurate measurements.
  5. If there is only one spark plug cap, attach one multimeter lead to the spark plug cap and the other to the primary side power connector.
  6. For this test with that form of ignition coil, use the spark plug cap as the negative side of the main.


How to test an ATV stator? 

  1. To extract the stator, you’ll need a multimeter and some simple hand tools. A single-phase stator or a three-phase stator are the two options. The most popular step is three, and you likely have it.
  2. Check your stator’s wiring harness to be sure. A three-phase stator is identified by three wires of the same color (usually white, yellow, or black). That collection of three wires won’t be found in a single-phase stator.
  3. Next, we’ll put the ignition coil’s secondary side to the test. The spark plug caps are on this site. Put the red test lead in one, and the black test lead in the other if your ignition coil has two spark plug caps. Look for resistance of about 16k ohms, but search your service manual for accurate measurements.
  4. If there is only one spark plug cap, attach one multimeter lead to the spark plug cap and the other to the primary side power connector.
  5. For this test with that form of ignition coil, use the spark plug cap as the negative side of the main.
  6. You’ll need a new stator if your meter reads OL, which stands for an open line. Attach one lead to a stator leg (via the connector) and the other to the stator body or chassis ground on your computer to see if your stator is shorting to ground. On your meter, there should be no reading. You will need to replace your stator if you get a reading on either of the legs.

If you have access to the simulator, you can perform this test while the stator is still present. To do the actual research, I find it easier to remove the stator, but this can be a pain in and of itself.


Sum it up

That’s all there is to the most common electrical issues with ATVs. It’s typically a faulty kill button, a loose cable, or a faulty link. Hopefully, you will be able to resolve your problem without too much difficulty.

Some of the most time-consuming issues are electrical ones. If you don’t want to mess around with all the possible reasons, it may be worth it to take your computer to a store.

Even so, a quick check of certain contacts before calling in a specialist isn’t a bad idea.


Recent Posts